Title Planetary Physics
Description Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH). Formation of solar nebula; origin of planets and their satellites; comets, asteroids, and meteorites; celestial mechanics and dynamics; physics of planetary interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres. P/NP or letter grading.
Units 4 units
Course Days Monday
Time 12:00 PM - 12:05 PM
Location TBA
Level Undergraduate
Course ID 178630200
Type Lecture
Instructor William Newman
Email win@ucla.edu
Phone 310-825-3912
Office Hours Tues. and Thurs. 3 p.m.
Location 4640 Geology

Syllabus

Syllabus

Textbook: W.K. Hartmann 2005 (5th edition or later), Moons and Planets, Thomson-Brooks Cole.

Catalog Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, Physics 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH). Formation of solar nebula; origin of planets and their satellites; comets, asteroids, and meteorites; celestial mechanics and dynamics; physics of planetary interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres. P/NP or letter grading.

Description of Course: This course will employ concepts from lower-division level physics and mathematics to explore the physics of the planets, especially in our solar system but also looking at recent discoveries germane to extra-solar planetary systems. The textbook for the course will be William K. Hartmann’s fifth edition of Moons & Planets. While presently out of print, it is available from a variety of booksellers online with new copies priced from around $100 and up. (If you have not already purchased a copy of this book, please do so as soon as possible. We will be placing a copy on reserve in the Geology-Geophysics Library.) We will employ a primarily lecture format, where discussion will be especially welcome. This course will utilize the order of presentation employed by Hartmann’s text, but other materials will be introduced to update and expand the scope of the presentation.

Grades for this course will be based upon the following: 4 take-home assignments (40%), a research project (20%), a midterm examination (10%; date to be determined, preferably May 15), and a final examination (30%; date to be determined, preferably June 11). The research topics must be cleared with Professor Newman by May 15; both a written report and an oral presentation will be required during the last week of classes. It is strongly recommended that students consult Professor Newman during the development of their projects.