Featured Stories

2016 Newsletter Available online

The Fall 2016 edition of the EPSS newsletter is available online. It includes many stories that describe our activities over the past few months. Happy reading!

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Exploring Your Universe 2016

The annual Exploring Your Universe event took place on the UCLA campus on Sunday November 6, 2016.

Event Info

Your Gift Matters

All gifts to Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, no matter their size, help the Department maintain and strengthen its international reputation for excellence, as well as its impact in the community.

Donate!

Upcoming Events

EPSS 287B - Tectonics & Seismology Seminar

Title: Climatic and geodynamic influences on ocean island geomorphology
Date: Feb. 22, 2017
Time: noon - 12:50 p.m.
Speaker: Kim Huppert

EPSS M288B - Space Physics Seminar

Title: Cassini/Enceladus torus
Date: Feb. 24, 2017
Time: 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Speaker: Yingdong Jia

EPSS 287B - Tectonics & Seismology Seminar

Title: Seismic site characterization using proxy- or measurement-based VS30 estimates
Date: March 1, 2017
Time: noon - 12:50 p.m.
Speaker: Alan Yong

EPSS IPLEX17W - iPlex Lunch

Title: TBA
Date: March 3, 2017
Time: noon - 1 p.m.
Speaker: Eric Mamajek

EPSS M288B - Space Physics Seminar

Title: Distant tail: mantle and LLBL
Date: March 3, 2017
Time: 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Speaker: Chih-Ping Wang

Event Calendar

Greetings from the Chair


The Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences at UCLA is on a mission to understand and protect our home in the Universe. We seek to understand how planets like ours form and evolve, how life on our planet developed, and whether life exists elsewhere. We study the physical and chemical conditions that prevailed 4.6 billion years ago when the planets formed, the processes that shape planetary bodies, and interactions with the space environment. Using data from the lab, field, spacecraft, and telescopes, we study a wide range of important questions about the Earth, the Solar System, and beyond. We also characterize natural hazards so that we can better protect humanity from earthquakes, tsunamis, space weather, and asteroid impacts. I invite you to explore our web site to find out about the impressive research conducted by our students, researchers, and faculty.

--Jean-Luc Margot